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Setup of EX switcher

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Introduction

The Ex unit forms part of the V5 kit.

 

EX remote

The Ex switcher is a remote unit that, in conjunction with an appropriate daughter board installed in the ECU, allows the program used by the ECU to be switched on the fly from within the car. The switcher front plate has an led digit display and two buttons; ‘+’ and ‘-‘.

General Use

The program is selected by using the ‘+’ and ‘-‘ buttons on the front of the unit. Program zero is a special case; it is selected by a combination of key presses and this is the mode from which setting changes are reached.

Mode zero

Mode zero is reached in a different way from the other programs:

1. Press and hold the ‘+’ button
2. While still depressing the ‘+’ button, press and release the ‘-‘ button
3. Release the ‘+’ button

Program 0 is selected when in this mode. If the ignition is switched off and on when the switcher is in mode 0 then the led display will remain unlit. Pressing the ‘+’ button will relight the display and select program 1.

Changing brightness level

The brightness level can be set as follows:

1. Follow the instructions above to enter mode zero
2. Press the ‘-‘ button. A ‘c’ should be displayed on the led.
3. Use the ‘+’ button to select a level (1 minimum to 5 maximum).
4. Press the ‘-‘ button to save the value selected.

Changing the maximum program allowed

The maximum program selection allowed can be altered as follows:

1. Follow the instructions above to enter mode zero repeatedly until a ‘.’ is displayed on the led
2. Select the maximum program number desired
3. Wait, without pressing any buttons. The value set will be saved after a fixed time has elapsed.

 

Installation of Switching Adapter board and High Boost EEPROM in Lotus Elan

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Instructions

    1. Disconnect the battery
    2. Locate the and remove the ECU. The position depends on the type of Elan:

        • Right hand drive

          The ECU position varies slightly depending on whether the car is equipped with air conditioning but the procedure is essentially the same.

          ecu_pos_rhd
          ECU position RHD no air-con
          ecu_pos_rhd_aircon
          RHD, with air conditioning

          Access to the ECU can be easily gained by flexing the top of the glove-box to defeat the catch and fully dropping the glove-box as shown:

          image3

          Remove the two multipole plugs at the right hand side. These can be quite hard to get out - be patient and don’t pull by the wires.

          The ECU is held in a bracket by two studs at the bottom. Loosen the two 10mm nuts and withdraw the ECU (pivot the loose side clear of the bracket and pull clear).

      • Left Hand Drive

        ecu_pos_lhd
        ECU position LHD

            (Instructions from Doug a.k.a. av8ndoc)

          1. Look up there and see what's what -- find the two 10mm nuts on the side brackets -- the other side has rubber bungs and pops right out
          2. With driver's door open, sit on floor right next to the car and reach right hand in and find the ecu by feel and the 2 nuts. (This is actually a very comfortable normal sitting position)
          3. put 10mm ratchet spanner on the two nuts to loosen them a bit only
          4. undo the nuts carefully by hand -- don't drop and lose them!
          5. pull ECU out and fold it down on the harness
          6. Remove the two multipole plugs. These can be quite hard to get out - be patient and don’t pull by the wires.
    3. Ensure you are earthed to prevent damage to either the ECU or the upgrade. The ECU has a lid held on by two ¼" head screws. Undo these screws and remove the lid.
      image4

      The blue-lidded MEMCAL and the retaining clips at each end can be clearly seen.
    4. Push the clips at each end outwards to remove the MEMCAL from the ECU.

      image5

      Notice the chip inside the MEMCAL can be seen through the opening on the left and the limp home circuitry through the window on the right in the picture above.
    5. Take the MEMCAL and plug it into the Moates adapter card (a V4 card is shown but the principle is the same):

      image6

      The side of the MEMCAL with the limp-home circuitry should be connected to the adapter board. In the picture above the chips of the MEMCAL and adapter can be seen to be on the same side.
    6. The V5 Assembly is shown below:

      v5_switcher
      The two jumpers at the top left are shown in the wrong position they should be like this:

      v5_jumpers
      In the 29F040 position (which is the chip I use in the board). I should have already positioned them correctly but check and make sure.

 

    1. The unit can be used without the remote control by selecting the desired program with the integrated switch. However if the remote control is to be used the switch MUST be in the zero position (as below)

      v5_switch

      Again I will endeavour to pre-position the switch in position 0.
    2. The ECU casing can be opened up a little by taking the top and bottom edges of the casing at the open side and pushing them apart. This gives more room to insert the MEMCAL/adapter assembly. The adapter should be held with the adapter board horizontal and the MEMCAL pushed into the opening in the ECU case (again forgive the V4 illustrations):

      image7
      Move the assembly in to the case until the plug on the bottom of the adapter board is over the MEMCAL socket in the ECU. Don’t use force, if the assembly is positioned correctly and the case is opened sufficiently it goes in quite easily.
    3. Ensure the adapter card is correctly situated over the socket. Then push it home by applying pressure to both ends of the adapter board assembly. The catches will pop up to a vertical position when it is fully home.
    4. Plug in the switcher cable lead.

 

    1. Replace the plastic end piece,

      Image8
      then the lid. The switcher cable plug protrudes a little and so the lid, while it will fit, is slightly bowed upwards. This is quite useful as it provides an opening through which the cable can exit the case. Replace the lid screws
    2. Remount in car, reconnect the two ECU plugs and finally the battery.
    3. Position the remote in the glove box or somewhere more accessible. 


integratedswitcher

       

remote_by_clock

Testing

Turn on the ignition. The check engine light (CEL) should blink and stay on as normal. On starting the car should behave entirely normally. If the CEL remains on then you should disconnect the battery for a minute or two and retry. If the problem persists remove the ECU, check your handywork and if necessary remove the upgrade.

If the CEL remains off and the car is running normally then test drive the car. Allow the engine to reach operating temperature before attempting any boost testing – the ECU will limit boost until the engine is warm. Once operating temperature has been reached, and the road conditions allow, use full throttle. The boost observed depends on the program you have selected:

  • KilimanjaroThe boost will increase rapidly with RPM until reaching 0.8bar from around 3600RPM.
  • Everest The boost will increase rapidly with RPM until reaching 0.9bar from around 4000 RPM.
  • Elysium The boost will increase rapidly with RPM until reaching 0.95bar at around 4400RPM and falling back to 0.9bar at 6000rpm

Catalyst equipped cars may experience a later peak and even lower peak boost depending on the state of the catalysts and the resultant backpressure.
If the boost goes off the scale, where boost creep was not present before and the boost gauge was working normally, then an FCD may be present – I’d recommend removal of the upgrade until the cause is identified and corrected.

Troubleshooting

If the boost does not reach the target value under full throttle and high revs thenIf a BOV is installed it may be opening early preventing full boost (see checklist section)

  1. The TPS may be faulty maladjusted
  2. The throttle cable may be maladjusted
  3. Exhaust back-pressure
  4. A leak in the intake track
  5. Bad spark plugs (gap to big, fouled or otherwise faulty)
  6. Another pre-existing fault

Let me know if you have problems and I’ll do my best to help.

Installation of V4 Adapter board and High Boost EEPROM in Lotus Elan 

pdf instructions

Instructions

  1. Disconnect the battery
  2. Locate the and remove the ECU. The position depends on the type of Elan:

    • Right hand drive
      The ECU position varies slightly depending on whether the car is equipped with air conditioning but the procedure is essentially the same.

      ecu_pos_rhd
      ECU position RHD no air-con
      ecu_pos_rhd_aircon
      RHD, with air conditioning

      Access to the ECU can be easily gained by flexing the top of the glove-box to defeat the catch and fully dropping the glove-box as shown:

      image3

      Remove the two multipole plugs at the right hand side. These can be quite hard to get out - be patient and don’t pull by the wires.
      The ECU is held in a bracket by two studs at the bottom. Loosen the two 10mm nuts and withdraw the ECU (pivot the loose side clear of the bracket and pull clear).
    • Left Hand Drive
      ecu_pos_lhd
      ECU position LHD

          (Instructions from Doug a.k.a. av8ndoc)

        1. Look up there and see what's what -- find the two 10mm nuts on the side brackets -- the other side has rubber bungs and pops right out
        2. With driver's door open, sit on floor right next to the car and reach right hand in and find the ecu by feel and the 2 nuts. (This is actually a very comfortable normal sitting position)
        3. put 10mm ratchet spanner on the two nuts to loosen them a bit only
        4. undo the nuts carefully by hand -- don't drop and lose them!
        5. pull ECU out and fold it down on the harness
        6. Remove the two multipole plugs. These can be quite hard to get out - be patient and don’t pull by the wires.
  3. Ensure you are earthed to prevent damage to either the ECU or the upgrade. The ECU has a lid held on by two ¼" head screws. Undo these screws and remove the lid.

    image4
    The blue-lidded MEMCAL and the retaining clips at each end can be clearly seen.
  4. Push the clips at each end outwards to remove the MEMCAL from the ECU.

    image5
    Notice the chip inside the MEMCAL can be seen through the opening on the left and the limp home circuitry through the window on the right in the picture above.
  5. Take the MEMCAL and plug it into the Moates adapter card:

    image6

    The side of the MEMCAL with the limp-home circuitry should be connected to the adapter board. In the picture above the chips of the MEMCAL and adapter can be seen to be on the same side.
  6. The ECU casing can be opened up a little by taking the top and bottom edges of the casing at the open side and pushing them apart. This gives more room to insert the MEMCAL/adapter assembly. The adapter should be held with the adapter board horizontal and the MEMCAL pushed into the opening in the ECU case:

    image7
    Move the assembly in to the case until the plug on the bottom of the adapter board is over the MEMCAL socket in the ECU. Don’t use force, if the assembly is positioned correctly and the case is opened sufficiently it goes in quite easily.
  7. Ensure the adapter card is correctly situated over the socket. Then push it home by applying pressure to both ends of the adapter board assembly. The catches will pop up to a vertical position when it is fully home.
  8. Plug in the switcher cable lead.
  9. Replace the plastic end piece,

    Image8
    then the lid and screws.
  10. Remount in car, reconnect the two ECU plugs and finally the battery.

 

Testing

Turn on the ignition. The check engine light (CEL) should blink and stay on as normal. On starting the car should behave entirely normally. If the CEL remains on then you should disconnect the battery for a minute or two and retry. If the problem persists remove the ECU, check your handywork and if necessary remove the upgrade.

If the CEL remains off and the car is running normally then test drive the car. Allow the engine to reach operating temperature before attempting any boost testing – the ECU will limit boost until the engine is warm. Once operating temperature has been reached, and the road conditions allow, use full throttle. The boost observed depends on the chip you have selected:

  • KilimanjaroThe boost will increase rapidly with RPM until reaching 0.8bar from around 3600RPM.
  • Everest The boost will increase rapidly with RPM until reaching 0.9bar from around 4000 RPM.

Catalyst equipped cars may experience a later peak and even lower peak boost depending on the state of the catalysts and the resultant backpressure.
If the boost goes off the scale without fuel cut, where boost creep was not present before and the boost gauge was working normally, then a fuel cut defenser (FCD) may be present – I’d recommend removal of the upgrade until the cause is identified and corrected.

Troubleshooting

If the boost does not reach the target value under full throttle and high revs and a blow off valve (BOV) is installed it may be opening early preventing full boost (see checklist section). Other possible issues include:

  1. The TPS may be faulty or maladjusted
  2. The throttle cable may be maladjusted
  3. Exhaust back-pressure
  4. A leak in the intake track
  5. Bad spark plugs (gap to big, fouled or otherwise faulty)
  6. Another pre-existing fault

Let me know if you have problems and I’ll do my best to help.

PROM ids

The table below shows the PROM id associated with various Elans and the 13th digit of the Vehicle identification number (VIN) that should help to identify which you have in your Elan.  If the label is still on the case of the ECU you can see the four letter code is printed at the bottom right (at least on the ECUs I have). Level with that on the left is an eight digit code (not the service number, the other one) and the last four digits of that are (in my examples) the four digit PROM id... So, with the ANXZ label I'm sitting looking at now it has the 8 digit code 16129239 and the PROM id read from the MEMCAL is 9239.

 

Elan type Prom id Code Eight digit label code 13th Vin digit Comments
SE
9239
9929
ANXZ
AUFH
16129239
16149929
1

The most common SE PROM. Can have problems meeting MOT emissions requirements due to the small adjustment range on the CO potentiometer. If your car has one of these and meets emissions requirements without difficulty you should stick with this chip. If your Elan has trouble meeting emissions standards then look at the 9930 below...

N.b.  The 9929 is a fully compatible updated version of the 9239.

SE 9930 ? ? 1

As 9929 but with revised CO potentiometer calibration to ensure that emission standards can always be met within the adjustment range of the potentiometer. See here for details of the retrofit and here for how to find if your car has one. This chip will allow any emissions problems to be remedied but if the car is currently fitted with a 9239 or 9929 then the CO potentiometer will require require adjustment after the chip is fitted to prevent lumpy idle problems.

S2, late SE
and
US - 49 States
1499 AXMZ 16161499 4
2

The only PROM used in the S2 and in US 49 states Elans. I've come across one in a Japanese Elan too. Catalyst equipped cars may not hit the Everest targets unless the backpressure from the catalyst equipped exhaust is addressed, although they should still gain appreciably in boost and power.

US Californian 9949 ?

?16139949?

[guessed]

3

Strict emission PROM for Californian Elans. As above, catalyst equipped cars may not hit the Everest targets unless the backpressure  from the catalyst equipped exhaust is addressed. Does not work in 49 States Elan.

Early version of 49 states?

Scandinavian?

5849 AWKZ 16155849 ?

A rare closed loop variant.  The comments concerning the performance of catalyst equipped cars given above also apply here.

 

The VIN can be found in the locations below:

VIN_location

How to choose

Checking your car's suitability

Read the requirements to ensure your car is suitable for the installation of a chip.

Finding your PROM id

Before you can choose a chip you must find out what PROM type is already in your car so you can purchase a compatible chip. Look at the vehicle identification number of the car, note the 13th character and consult the PROM id decoder here.

9929 or 9930?

If you have a 13th VIN digit of '1' and are unsure if the 9930 chip has been retrofitted then inspect the car's service history and see if it's mentioned there. If not then inspect the casing of the ECU (look at the installation instructions for details how to locate it) and look for evidence of any markings put there by a mechanic after replacement to show the work has been done. Failing those the only certain methods are by ElanScan, a Tech-1 (garage diagnostic tool) or opening up the ECU (again explained in the installation instructions) and checking the label on the MEMCAL directly. Most 'type 1' cars do not have the 9930 but around 10% do.

Choosing a mountain

The chips and upgrades are located in the 'Categories' section. Once you know what PROM id you need click on the subcategory to narrow the available items down to the ones you can use and read the descriptions. Its worth looking at the other content about the chips to get a feel of what they do and how they work. I'd suggest starting with a V4 as a first chip, you get 90% of the benefit with less erosion of the safety margin, no switching box to trail across the cabin and there is an upgrade path if you want to go to the V5 in the future.